Meet: Barnyard Style Meets Los Angeles at Camarillo Ranch!

Barnyard-style weddings have become immensely popular over the last few wedding seasons! Now it is easy to envision a gorgeous barn wedding near the rolling hills and farms near our Nashville office in Tennessee–but what about next to the beaches, highways and skyscrapers of Los Angeles?

We were recently tasked with finding such a venue for one of our newest couples, and we think we hit the jackpot! Just about 30 minutes from the city center of downtown Los Angeles, heading north along the scenic Highway 101, is Camarillo Ranch. This historic venue provides a lush, sprawling estate with beautiful scenery and you guessed it: a perfect red barn!

There are 2 focal points of the ranch. The first is the house that sits on the property, an amazing Victorian style home. The home is available for cocktail hour, bridal prep, and pre-wedding photos for the bride and groom. But the grounds surrounding the home are a wonderful bonus! There are 3 different lawn spaces for an outdoor ceremony, from a smaller garden featuring a lovely gazebo to the vast open space of the front lawns that can seat a few hundred guests. The second main point is that big red barn, which can easily be transformed to suit a variety of visions for your reception. Adding soft lighting and vintage touches can create a rustic-chic feel; or keep things on the casual side for real country ho-down! The options at this venue are limitless.

We can’t wait to begin working with our new couple and the super helpful staff of the ranch! The wedding won’t be until 2015, but that gives us plenty of time to keep dreaming about all of the unique and fun things that could be done at Camarillo Ranch!

Check out a few awesome photos:

The Victorian Style Home. Image via Christina Logan Design.

The Victorian Style Home. Image via Christina Logan Design.

The large tree in the main lawn is a gorgeous focal point for a ceremony. Image via CamarilloRanch.org

The large tree in the main lawn is a gorgeous focal point for a ceremony. Image via CamarilloRanch.org

For more intimate weddings, the gazebo and lawns are a picture perfect setting! Image via Camarillo  Ranch.org

For more intimate weddings, the gazebo and lawns are a picture perfect setting! Image via Camarillo Ranch.org

That beautiful red barn! Image via CamarilloRanch.org

That beautiful red barn! Image via CamarilloRanch.org

Another shot of the barn to give you an idea of how much space is available! Image via CamarilloRanch.orgAnother shot of the barn to give you an idea of how much space is available! Image via CamarilloRanch.org

Wud up party people!

So I probably shouldn’t say “wud up” because I’m not sure I can pull it off.  But today’s blog is about supplying the party to the people: ie. the booze.  How much do you need, how do you calculate amounts etc. etc. etc..

We’re gonna give you a few little formulas here, and hopefully it will leave you with a little to spare, vs. not enough.  And in some crazy states they even allow you to return the alcohol if you don’t use it!
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For a five hour event, it is likely that your guests will have average at 1 drink per hour.  Keep in mind I say average, because your sorority sister Sadie will have a few more, but big aunt Agnes will have a few less.  And at 150 guests for 5 hours, that comes out to 750 drink servings. Remember, we are overestimating to play it safe.  (Keep in mind that below I’m being literal, but feel free to round up or down to what you feel is best).  You can also alter these if you feel it will be hot and you’ll want more white wine vs. cold, or if your guests are primarily beer drinkers, etc..

Now if you’re having just beer and wine, it’s a pretty easy formula.  About 3/4 will drink wine, so you want to split it accordingly.  Wine has 5 servings per bottle:
188 bottles of beer (1 keg = approx 330 bottles, so try a half keg)
282 servings red wine = 56 bottles
282 servings white wine = 56 bottles

If you are having sparkling wine and doing a toast, you can decrease a little from everywhere, or just add on 150 servings of champagne = 30 bottles.  You could also ask them to pour half glasses, and instead order 20 bottles of sparkly.

This is a great place to start.  Now let’s say you are having 2 specialty cocktails: a bride’s drink and a groom’s drink.  We go all the way back to the beginning where we have 750 drinks for the night.  Assess your group and determine if they are more hard alcohol drinkers, or wine or beer. A handle of alcohol (60oz) you have about 30-40 servings.
So I do 750 servings and take it down to a split of 4 different categories, 25% beer, 60% wine, 15% specialty cocktails:
188 bottles of beer
225 servings of red wine = 45 bottles
225 servings of white wine = 45 bottles
57 servings vodka = 2 handles vodka
57 servings gin = 2 handles gin
and for every handle of alcohol you need 2 times the mixer, so 4 coke and 4 cranberry.

Now for the full bar, the ratio changes again.  You’re looking at about 25% liquor, 15% beer and 60% wine.  Taking our magic number 750 servings, we get:
113 bottles of beer
225 servings red = 45 bottles
225 servings white = 45 bottles
187 servings liquor (6.25 handles of alcohol, buy your favorite varietals).

Hopefully this is helpful for you and I didn’t throw around too many numbers to catch you off guard.  It should be fairly simple if you know how to break down your percentages.  And if you’re still really lost, try this alcohol calculator.